Airline industry changes

| August 24, 2017

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Aaron Saltzman reports on changes meant to lower prices and boost competition in Canadian airspace Welcome to my Web site where I will give an overview of the little history that I know about the airline industry. Based on my experience as a flight attendant for three years I am writing this Web site to share my experience and vivid emotions that I lived during those three years. Also, the contribution of some of my fellow colleagues helped to gather interviews and pictures of those experiences.

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Avidyne

Based in Lincoln, Mass., Avidyne Corporation is a market-leading developer of integrated avionics systems for light general aviation (GA) aircraft. Avidyne’s continuing leadership in innovation and its Flying Made Simple™ system design make flying safer, more accessible and more enjoyable for pilots and their passengers.

OTHER ARTICLES

Good drones: the UAVs changing airport operations for the better

Article | February 27, 2020

Drones may be the source of groans in the aviation industry, with many causing delayed flights and safety hazards. But what about the vast potential for UAVs to provide assistance and even improve safety? Here's a look at how drones could help rather than hinder airports. The global commercial drone market is expected to grow by 26% each year from 2016 to reach a value of $10,738m by 2022. Even airports and airlines can benefit from the maturation of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology, with applications ranging from airport inspections to bird control and drone delivery.

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How to be eco-friendly in the aviation industry?

Article | May 12, 2021

Each year airlines begin new sustainability initiatives, experiment with biofuels, and offset their carbon emissions on selected flights; yet, sustainability should not only be a topic of discussion when an aircraft is in the air but also when it’s on the ground. In just one year, a Boeing 777, 787, Airbus A330, and A350, burn an extra 265,000 litres of fuel due to the 1% increase in drag. As a result, a full year’s operations of such an aircraft costs US$77,600 more than during the previous year. A dirty aircraft exterior is full of microscopic patches of dust and mud that impact the airliner’s operational efficiency by creating turbulent airflow across the whole fuselage. While the problem of additional drag is not new, there are no solutions to combat it other than performing regular cleaning of the aircraft’s exterior. Reducing drag – through cleaning – on aircraft fuselage, wings, engine cowlings, and stabilizer brings another challenge; how to remain sustainable while performing the exterior cleaning process? A popular, yet wasteful pressurized water cleaning technique requires more than 11,300 litres of water to clean one Airbus A380 aircraft and more than 9,500 litres to clean a Boeing 777. Traditionally, aircraft are cleaned four to five times per year, and with more than 48 thousand airframes in the world, the amount of water used each year is immense. As a result, the positives of clean fuselages are outweighed by the negatives of wasteful usage of expensive and environmentally important resources. This raises a question: whether it is possible to be eco-friendly in the aviation industry when one solution brings even more challenges than benefits? While the answer may look complicated, the definite answer is yes. The use of robots in household applications has proven that robotification is an inevitable and much-needed process to achieve even more efficient operational performance. One of the solutions to address the inefficient and time-consuming process of washing an aircraft fuselage is to employ an aircraft exterior cleaning robot. The market offerings like Nordic Dino, have been perfected and adapted to work with a wide range of aircraft fuselage types. Such robots are designed to minimize the use of water and detergent on every wash; saving more than 30% more water when compared to traditional washing methods. At the same time, built with sustainability in mind, the robots can be equipped with electric motors, further minimizing the environmental impact. “Sustainability and eco-friendliness should not be viewed as challenges or impossible achievements in the aviation industry. By utilizing the right equipment, finding alternatives to polluting methods, and increasing efficiency at every step possible, companies could come one step closer to operational efficiency as well as sustainability targets. Our offering, Nordic Dino can reduce the use of water and detergent and can be powered by electricity, reducing carbon and nitrogen dioxide emissions. By the robotification of the cleaning process we present a solution to MROs and dedicated aircraft cleaning companies to become green.” – commented Jan Brunstedt, CEO of Aviator Robotics AB.

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Where Will Vistara Fly Its New Boeing 787 Dreamliners?

Article | March 3, 2020

Vistara’s stunning new Boeing 787 Dreamliner has been officially unveiled in Delhi this week. While we’ve all enjoyed looking at the beautiful livery and new cabin products on board, the one question we all want answering is “where and when can we fly it?”. Vistara is being somewhat tight-lipped about its route plans for the aircraft. However, we can make some educated predictions about where we’re likely to see this beautiful bird in operation first.

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Here’s What Will Happen Next to Corporate Airfares

Article | April 7, 2020

To paint a picture of what corporate airfares will look like once planes return to the skies is becoming more difficult by the day — if not impossible. Airlines, for one, have more pressing matters to deal with as they fight for survival during the ongoing crisis. Most in the U.S. will be working through the fine print of the $2 trillion U.S. stimulus package that throws them a lifeline of $50 billion in grants and loans. Other carriers, particularly in Europe and Asia, have already downsized and furloughed most of their workforce and are now turning to refinancing. Cases in point include Air France-KLM, which is now looking for $6.5 billion in state-backed loans, while last week Singapore Airlines revealed it had secured $13 billion in new funding.

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Spotlight

Avidyne

Based in Lincoln, Mass., Avidyne Corporation is a market-leading developer of integrated avionics systems for light general aviation (GA) aircraft. Avidyne’s continuing leadership in innovation and its Flying Made Simple™ system design make flying safer, more accessible and more enjoyable for pilots and their passengers.

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