Austrian Airlines launches direct flights from Miami to Vienna

As of this month, South Florida-based world jaunters have several new air travel options and expanded capacity on existing routes.

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Qatar Airways

Qatar Airways is the national airline of the State of Qatar. Based in Doha, the Airline’s trend-setting on-board product focuses on: comfort, fine cuisine, the latest in-flight audio & video entertainment, award-winning service and a modern aircraft fleet averaging around 4 years of age.

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Aviation Technology

How to be eco-friendly in the aviation industry?

Article | June 2, 2022

Each year airlines begin new sustainability initiatives, experiment with biofuels, and offset their carbon emissions on selected flights; yet, sustainability should not only be a topic of discussion when an aircraft is in the air but also when it’s on the ground. In just one year, a Boeing 777, 787, Airbus A330, and A350, burn an extra 265,000 litres of fuel due to the 1% increase in drag. As a result, a full year’s operations of such an aircraft costs US$77,600 more than during the previous year. A dirty aircraft exterior is full of microscopic patches of dust and mud that impact the airliner’s operational efficiency by creating turbulent airflow across the whole fuselage. While the problem of additional drag is not new, there are no solutions to combat it other than performing regular cleaning of the aircraft’s exterior. Reducing drag – through cleaning – on aircraft fuselage, wings, engine cowlings, and stabilizer brings another challenge; how to remain sustainable while performing the exterior cleaning process? A popular, yet wasteful pressurized water cleaning technique requires more than 11,300 litres of water to clean one Airbus A380 aircraft and more than 9,500 litres to clean a Boeing 777. Traditionally, aircraft are cleaned four to five times per year, and with more than 48 thousand airframes in the world, the amount of water used each year is immense. As a result, the positives of clean fuselages are outweighed by the negatives of wasteful usage of expensive and environmentally important resources. This raises a question: whether it is possible to be eco-friendly in the aviation industry when one solution brings even more challenges than benefits? While the answer may look complicated, the definite answer is yes. The use of robots in household applications has proven that robotification is an inevitable and much-needed process to achieve even more efficient operational performance. One of the solutions to address the inefficient and time-consuming process of washing an aircraft fuselage is to employ an aircraft exterior cleaning robot. The market offerings like Nordic Dino, have been perfected and adapted to work with a wide range of aircraft fuselage types. Such robots are designed to minimize the use of water and detergent on every wash; saving more than 30% more water when compared to traditional washing methods. At the same time, built with sustainability in mind, the robots can be equipped with electric motors, further minimizing the environmental impact. “Sustainability and eco-friendliness should not be viewed as challenges or impossible achievements in the aviation industry. By utilizing the right equipment, finding alternatives to polluting methods, and increasing efficiency at every step possible, companies could come one step closer to operational efficiency as well as sustainability targets. Our offering, Nordic Dino can reduce the use of water and detergent and can be powered by electricity, reducing carbon and nitrogen dioxide emissions. By the robotification of the cleaning process we present a solution to MROs and dedicated aircraft cleaning companies to become green.” – commented Jan Brunstedt, CEO of Aviator Robotics AB.

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Design and Engineering

Will Flights Like Project Sunrise Be The Future Of Air Travel?

Article | January 7, 2022

With rescue flights crisscrossing the globe and passengers keen to get where they are going as soon as possible, will we see the end of hub to hub travel? Has this current aviation crisis signaled the decline of the current model of aviation we know today? One reporter at Simple Flying gives his opinion.

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Air Transport

Path to Recovery: Aviation Trends to Expect in the Next Five Years

Article | July 15, 2022

Is the aviation industry finally reviving after the devastating 2020? If yes, then what will it show in the next five years? 2020 will be remembered in airline history as the most turbulent year to date. Due to the pandemic, the period brought massive changes in the airline industry—business models and customer behavior globally. As a result, regaining customer confidence and reforming business models have become a critical factor for airlines to uncloud the economic storm and remain a formidable competitor in the years of uncertainty ahead. Technologies that were being used before the pandemic are now being studied well with vividness. The inclusion of new technologies is onboarding, which somehow sets up new aviation industry trends. These will be a timely solution to fight the ongoing economic instability and challenges pouring in. To increase safety notions, boost business confidence, customer trust, and making airline operations more efficient, adaptability and high intelligent business outline is the new blueprint for survival and growth to happen in the next five years. Drivers of Emerging Trends The intention of emerging trends in the airline industry is from weak signals from a wide range of fields, including threats, technology, and potentiality to function remotely, impacting the industry’s all-over operational dynamics. The trends are setting primarily due to the winds of change pounding the industry from different directions. Be it from technological, demographical to environmental shifts. Understanding the potential business landscape is therefore critical to ensure what the future of air travel will be. During a study conducted by IATA, business leaders in the airline industry identified the most critical drivers of emerging trends that were probable to have an influential impact by 2035. Also, these drivers suggest bringing more and more opportunities in business models and operational models of the industry beyond 2020. Therefore, it is the hope of all airline companies (you) that how you will be affected by future developments and how the entire business landscape will be changed by the trends discussed here. So, take advantage of the opportunities that some of these trends may give rise to. Leading Aviation Trends to Expect Cybersecurity Today, the importance of cybersecurity technology in the airline industry is rising. Airlines, now being aware of the downsides of using traditional operational models, is becoming more concerned about delivering high-performance using technology. With having well-operated cybersecurity functionality onboard, airlines are focusing on becoming more agile to scale their infrastructure. Also, in the next five years, increased connectivity between the real and virtual world, including robots, will eventually end the boundaries between virtual and physical security. IATA’s research with the London School of Economics found that the aviation industry will invest $15 billion by 2035, thanks to connected operations. Moreover, as cybersecurity matures, it will be seen as the most secure and scalable way of operating organizational data, and processing will be easier than before. You will have your airline documents within a secured centralized database, which will reduce silos of information that pose security risks and threats. Biometric Technology The pandemic, apart from bringing challenges, has helped businesses to leverage influential ideas to foster. Yes, it has made the airline industry emphasize the high usage of biometrics as a must-have technology stack. Biometrics is on the rise that can reinforce the idea of touchless operations in airports. The airline industry forecast has laid primary focus on self-service. However, as the blend of software and technology is more in demand, applications will be more defined than before in the coming five years. The technology will allow automated checks, self-service systems using devices like mobile, tablets, and others and cover iris, face recognition, fingerprint, which will even work with PPE masks. The industry is already making great experiences that allow businesses to conduct frictionless operations using biometric software and hardware. For example, in November 2020, Star Alliance introduced a novel interoperable biometric identity scanner platform for screening employees and passengers at airports. AI & Big Data Artificial Intelligence (AI) welcomed massive opportunities in transforming aviation business operations amid the ongoing crisis. This technology in the airline industry has immensely aided companies in collecting data and forming a virtual assistance environment for queries, enhanced logistics operation, security, and self-services with highly augmented reality. A market survey reveals that 97.2% of the aviation companies are installing big data and AI together. In fact, 76.5% of airline companies are gaining the value of data collection with the help of big data and AI. Source: resources.vistair.com AI is also being set up in terms of safety improvement initiatives and potential safety issues. In this case, Southwest Airlines partnered with NASA to build an automated system capable of preventing potential threats and breaches by using machine-learning algorithms. Green Technology Green technology is one of the upcoming trends in the airline industry in the next five years. The prediction is it will make novel changes in the airline industry from various directions like the workforce, shares, stakeholders, and governments. In the green tech concept, it is the generational shift and advancement that may head the change using new tools. These would bring in notable opportunities beyond 2021. If you observe, the pandemic has driven the agenda of sustainability in terms of climatic conditions. And you will be surprised to know that aviation has already put up a serious concern in its fossil fuel usage by 2035. Even aircraft manufacturers have begun their journey with green technology. To clarify this, the main objective of sustainable development for the coming years is decarbonization and green technology investment. Aviation companies like Japan Airlines and IAG are investing to bring net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, and by 2045, they aim to achieve carbon neutrality. And these, of course, are happening quickly due to digitalization. Expecting a Sustainable ‘DIGI-TECH’ Future As the pandemic brought downturn and slowdown in the airline industry, they have prioritized investing in digital by recognizing its importance and the optimum necessity. It is because it will be one of the significant ways for you to bring customers back and show your potential to endeavor services in a changing industry landscape. So, technology and digital together must be supported that respects businesses’ need to invest in multiple areas of functionality. On the other side, revenue management goals also need to be focused on to gain success among competitors. And following the path of trending digital platforms will make you victorious over revenue management performance objectives. In this way, you will be in the skin of the game and would observe your company rising through the challenges over the coming years. Frequently Asked Questions What are the topmost technologies that will define aviation beyond 2021? The technologies—3D printing in manufacturing, automation, and robotics are the topmost that will define how the aviation industry will be beyond 2021. How is technology being used in aviation? Airline operators use technology to market their services and products, advancing their software to leverage functionalities like biometrics, automation, cybersecurity, AI, big data, and more. Also, technology is being used to make safer airport operations like touchless checks to make safe for passengers. Will the aviation industry overcome challenges? Up until now, globally, the aviation industry is maintaining positive growth, despite prevailing challenges due to COVID-19. Technologically, it seems that the industry will foster slowly and gradually. Yet, there is sluggish growth economically due to high jet fuel prices. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What are the topmost technologies that will define aviation beyond 2021?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The technologies—3D printing in manufacturing, automation, and robotics are the topmost that will define how the aviation industry will be beyond 2021." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "How is technology being used in aviation?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Airline operators use technology to market their services and products, advancing their software to leverage functionalities like biometrics, automation, cybersecurity, AI, big data, and more. 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Aviation Technology

New Podcast Explores GE Aviation Technologies for a Decarbonized Future of Flight

Article | June 2, 2022

This week, the GE Gas Power team launched season five of Cutting Carbon, their award-winning podcast that focuses on climate change, the basics of what decarbonization is and the technologies behind it. In season five, the team is focused on decarbonization closer to home and invited Arjan Hegeman, GE Aviation’s general manger for advanced technologies, to talk about the future of flight. Learn more about the role of GE Aviation’s technologies available today and in development for tomorrow to make aircraft engines more fuel efficient and reduce carbon emissions. Open fan, hybrid electric and hydrogen combustion are all discussed by Hegeman and the hosts. Over two episodes, Hegeman also explains the importance of Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF), along with the new engine technologies, to help the aviation industry reach its goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. The Future of Flight is a two-part episode, and can be found as Episode 27 and Episode 28 under Cutting Carbon. You can listen to the podcast here or on your favorite streaming platform! The aviation industry is at an inflection point for new technology introduction and acceleration of technology development, Hegeman says. GE Aviation is currently developing its next-generation suite of engine technologies, including open fan engine architecture, hybrid-electric propulsion, and advanced thermal management concepts. GE Aviation is also supporting industry initiatives to approve and adopt 100% SAF and is partnering on a new flight demonstration program to test zero-carbon hydrogen fuel combustion. GE’s ambition is to be a net zero company by 2050, including the Scope 3 emissions from the use of sold products. GE is also committed to being carbon neutral by 2030 in its own facilities and operations, including Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions.

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Spotlight

Qatar Airways

Qatar Airways is the national airline of the State of Qatar. Based in Doha, the Airline’s trend-setting on-board product focuses on: comfort, fine cuisine, the latest in-flight audio & video entertainment, award-winning service and a modern aircraft fleet averaging around 4 years of age.

Related News

Miami International Airport moves to cut long waits in lines

Miami Today | December 11, 2018

County commissioners last week OK’d a contract with SITA Information Networking Computing USA to install systems to analyze lines and predict wait times at security checkpoints, allowing airport resources and staff to be allocated as needed leading, in theory, to shorter and faster lines. The county will pay SITA $2.92 million over five years to install and activate the system. It then has five one-year renewal options for continued maintenance and support valued in total at $763,000, Deputy Mayor Jack Osterholt wrote. The system will improve customer service, reduce queue wait times, increase non-aeronautical revenue and make informed decisions to improve overall airport operations, he wrote, by providing accurate real-time and historical data analytics for determining the average… wait times at all checkpoints [and] accurately measuring, counting and tracking passengers, staff and key asset movements.

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MIA closing in on serving Israel’s El Al Airlines

Volaris | February 14, 2017

Miami International Airport is inching closer to serving Israel’s El Al Airlines after county aviation officials visited Israel this month. The delegation, led by Director Emilio T. González, met with senior officials from El Al and Ben Gurion International Airport, the airline’s hub, Israel’s main international airport and its busiest, 12 miles southeast of Tel Aviv.

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Azul Airlines’ David Neeleman on the economy, Zika and the Olympics

Azul Brazilian Airlines | November 09, 2016

Low-cost air travel has been a hallmark of David Neeleman’s career since he founded Utah-based Morris Air, Canadian airline Westjet, JetBlue, and now Azul Brazilian Airlines, his latest venture. It is that affordable travel philosophy that is helping the Sao Paulo native lead his company through a Brazilian storm caused by a hemorrhaging economy, political unrest and Zika-induced health crisis. Throw in the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, and Neeleman has a full plate to contend with.

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Miami International Airport moves to cut long waits in lines

Miami Today | December 11, 2018

County commissioners last week OK’d a contract with SITA Information Networking Computing USA to install systems to analyze lines and predict wait times at security checkpoints, allowing airport resources and staff to be allocated as needed leading, in theory, to shorter and faster lines. The county will pay SITA $2.92 million over five years to install and activate the system. It then has five one-year renewal options for continued maintenance and support valued in total at $763,000, Deputy Mayor Jack Osterholt wrote. The system will improve customer service, reduce queue wait times, increase non-aeronautical revenue and make informed decisions to improve overall airport operations, he wrote, by providing accurate real-time and historical data analytics for determining the average… wait times at all checkpoints [and] accurately measuring, counting and tracking passengers, staff and key asset movements.

Read More

MIA closing in on serving Israel’s El Al Airlines

Volaris | February 14, 2017

Miami International Airport is inching closer to serving Israel’s El Al Airlines after county aviation officials visited Israel this month. The delegation, led by Director Emilio T. González, met with senior officials from El Al and Ben Gurion International Airport, the airline’s hub, Israel’s main international airport and its busiest, 12 miles southeast of Tel Aviv.

Read More

Azul Airlines’ David Neeleman on the economy, Zika and the Olympics

Azul Brazilian Airlines | November 09, 2016

Low-cost air travel has been a hallmark of David Neeleman’s career since he founded Utah-based Morris Air, Canadian airline Westjet, JetBlue, and now Azul Brazilian Airlines, his latest venture. It is that affordable travel philosophy that is helping the Sao Paulo native lead his company through a Brazilian storm caused by a hemorrhaging economy, political unrest and Zika-induced health crisis. Throw in the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, and Neeleman has a full plate to contend with.

Read More

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