Sikorsky Completes DARPA ALIAS Phase 1 Autonomous Flight

| May 31, 2016

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Sikorsky, a Lockheed Martin Company, has successfully demonstrated a 30-mile autonomous flight using a Sikorsky S-76 commercial helicopter to complete Phase 1 of an $8 million award from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)’s Aircrew Labor In-Cockpit Automation System (ALIAS) program.

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First Air

With over 70 years of flying experience, First Air is the leading airline in Canada’s Arctic. Together with our partner airlines we provide scheduled services to over 30 northern communities from our southern gateways Ottawa, Montreal, Winnipeg and Edmonton. First Air operates a fleet of 17 aircraft; Boeing 737-400s, ATR 42-500s and ATR 42-300s carrying over 200,000 passengers a year. Our fleet supports daily scheduled passenger service as well as cargo services for over 17 million kilograms of cargo each year.

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How to be eco-friendly in the aviation industry?

Article | May 12, 2021

Each year airlines begin new sustainability initiatives, experiment with biofuels, and offset their carbon emissions on selected flights; yet, sustainability should not only be a topic of discussion when an aircraft is in the air but also when it’s on the ground. In just one year, a Boeing 777, 787, Airbus A330, and A350, burn an extra 265,000 litres of fuel due to the 1% increase in drag. As a result, a full year’s operations of such an aircraft costs US$77,600 more than during the previous year. A dirty aircraft exterior is full of microscopic patches of dust and mud that impact the airliner’s operational efficiency by creating turbulent airflow across the whole fuselage. While the problem of additional drag is not new, there are no solutions to combat it other than performing regular cleaning of the aircraft’s exterior. Reducing drag – through cleaning – on aircraft fuselage, wings, engine cowlings, and stabilizer brings another challenge; how to remain sustainable while performing the exterior cleaning process? A popular, yet wasteful pressurized water cleaning technique requires more than 11,300 litres of water to clean one Airbus A380 aircraft and more than 9,500 litres to clean a Boeing 777. Traditionally, aircraft are cleaned four to five times per year, and with more than 48 thousand airframes in the world, the amount of water used each year is immense. As a result, the positives of clean fuselages are outweighed by the negatives of wasteful usage of expensive and environmentally important resources. This raises a question: whether it is possible to be eco-friendly in the aviation industry when one solution brings even more challenges than benefits? While the answer may look complicated, the definite answer is yes. The use of robots in household applications has proven that robotification is an inevitable and much-needed process to achieve even more efficient operational performance. One of the solutions to address the inefficient and time-consuming process of washing an aircraft fuselage is to employ an aircraft exterior cleaning robot. The market offerings like Nordic Dino, have been perfected and adapted to work with a wide range of aircraft fuselage types. Such robots are designed to minimize the use of water and detergent on every wash; saving more than 30% more water when compared to traditional washing methods. At the same time, built with sustainability in mind, the robots can be equipped with electric motors, further minimizing the environmental impact. “Sustainability and eco-friendliness should not be viewed as challenges or impossible achievements in the aviation industry. By utilizing the right equipment, finding alternatives to polluting methods, and increasing efficiency at every step possible, companies could come one step closer to operational efficiency as well as sustainability targets. Our offering, Nordic Dino can reduce the use of water and detergent and can be powered by electricity, reducing carbon and nitrogen dioxide emissions. By the robotification of the cleaning process we present a solution to MROs and dedicated aircraft cleaning companies to become green.” – commented Jan Brunstedt, CEO of Aviator Robotics AB.

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Is British Airways Eyeing A350 Flights To Melbourne Australia?

Article | March 9, 2020

The aviation world is abuzz with a rumor that British Airways is at least contemplating a return to the capital of Victoria. The UK flag carrier hasn’t flown to Melbourne since 2006, but inside information is suggesting that it’s a destination that is on the table for future network expansion. Currently, British Airways is the only UK airline still flying to Australia. Virgin Atlantic ended its London-Hong Kong-Sydney service in 2014, leaving just British Airways operating to Oceania, with its sole route a one stop itinerary between Heathrow and Sydney. Prior to this, BA had flown to Melbourne and Brisbane too, with stops in Hong Kong and Bangkok in the routings too.

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Why Has Airbus Built The A321XLR?

Article | February 21, 2020

Why did Airbus build the A321XLR? Why did they look at the market and decide that it needed an aircraft that could fly 4,700 nautical miles non-stop with passengers in a single-aisle? And why have airlines fallen in love with the aircraft? Let’s discuss why Airbus saw a need for this aircraft, and how airlines have reacted.

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American Airlines Eyes Direct Doha Flights – What To Expect

Article | February 25, 2020

On top of today’s announcement that American Airlines and Qatar Airways would launch a codeshare agreement, American also announced that it was exploring options for adding flights to Qatar Airways’ hub in Doha. What should passengers expect from this announcement? Launching a long-haul flight is something that requires careful planning. Currently, American is exploring launching flights to Doha’s Hamad Airport. This means that the airline is at the beginning stages of putting together a flight to Doha.

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Spotlight

First Air

With over 70 years of flying experience, First Air is the leading airline in Canada’s Arctic. Together with our partner airlines we provide scheduled services to over 30 northern communities from our southern gateways Ottawa, Montreal, Winnipeg and Edmonton. First Air operates a fleet of 17 aircraft; Boeing 737-400s, ATR 42-500s and ATR 42-300s carrying over 200,000 passengers a year. Our fleet supports daily scheduled passenger service as well as cargo services for over 17 million kilograms of cargo each year.

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