The Gulfstream G550 Cabin

| February 1, 2016

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Whether it’s a two-hour hop or a 14-hour nonstop flight, the Gulfstream G550 can handle it. Multiple seating areas create a range of possibilities, whether it’s a dedicated crew rest area, a private stateroom, a conference area or an entertainment space.

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Xactly Corp

Xactly delivers a scalable, enterprise platform for planning and incenting sales organizations, including sales quota and territory planning, incentive compensation management, and predictive analytics. Using this powerful sales performance management (SPM) portfolio, customers mitigate risk, accelerate sales performance, and increase business agility. Combined with Xactly Insights™-- the industry’s only empirical big data platform, Xactly empowers companies with real-time compensation insights and benchmarking data that maximize the bottom line. With an open, standards-based architecture, Xactly seamlessly integrates within an enterprise’s existing infrastructure, with the ability to work with any ERP, CRM, or HCM application, while meeting the highest enterprise standards in security, reliability, and privacy.

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8 Enlightening Tips to Make a Perfect Airline Marketing Plan

Article | October 19, 2021

What are the aviation marketing questions B2B audiences are asking in 2021? It is always beneficial to study the market scenario and your competitors when starting a new marketing plan. It provides you with a better vision and explores opportunities to become the best in the market and which marketing approach to take. Before you start planning your marketing in aviation, there are a few things you should sort out first. So, start your strategy by taking note of some important marketing questions! Important Questions to Create an Aviation Marketing Plan Are aviation businesses doing more or less marketing in 2022? What are the best-performing aviation marketing campaigns? What marketing strategies are unused in the aviation industry? What are the international aviation marketing trends? Which social media do aviation marketing professionals use for marketing? How do aviation professionals plan the finance for marketing? How do market leaders optimize their websites and build a brand image? Keeping these questions beside you, follow the tips to create a prolific aviation marketing plan. Tips at your Fingers Tip One: Things to do—Image Vs. Words Usage of images (visuals) has become influential to do marketing in aviation. While the industry has always focused on verbal content, both are equally important, but in different marketing ways. Let’s understand the following: SEO: Images can’t do well when doing optimization. But words are the main component in optimization in blogs, articles, whitepapers, webinars, and more. Social media: Images are becoming more perusable and are more understood by audiences. Whereas words are compelling to get more visitors to the website. Website content: In this, both usages of images and content are important to connect with the audience and market well. It’s crucial to watch the latest aviation industry trends to plan your marketing efforts. Referring to that, you can make the most of materials using images like: • Display & explain products • Create presentation showing numeric data • Create videos out of content • A sales presentation Remember, now prospects are emotionally persuaded to purchase products and services. This will lead you to grab more and better aviation business opportunities. You have to be quick and pick up to make the deal yours. Being interactive in your image creation is the better way to show your audience your ideology. Tip Two: Create One Idea at Once Any marketing plan should start from one idea at a time. To proceed with it, think and consider— “what is the one thing you want your audience, visitors, or potential targets to understand and get solutions for? It is necessary to analyze first because most marketing sales professionals remain muddled with the motive behind their marketing efforts. Therefore, it’s better to refrain from yourself and try to ideate one concept at a time. In other words, everything you create should support that ONE idea! Tip Three: Branding is key! Branding is visual. Visuals appeal to prospects in the aviation industry. Is your brand instantly recognizable to your prospects? If not, you need to pay more heed to it. Your brand is more than any other asset that communicates your story. A creative and reflective brand image is one of the impactful aviation industry trends most aviation professionals focus on. It’s vital because visuals have an appealing factor. In addition, the professionals in the aviation industry, engage and trust information displayed than told to them. So, create a visual brand image that tells a story. Another most important thing is to add testimonials to your brand. Yes! Video testimonials are much more potent because it comes from your prospects. Make a “wish list” of prospects you would like to get a testimonial from and add it to your website! Tip Four: Campaign it! With RIGHT message Before you head towards creating campaigns for marketing in aviation, remember that every campaign needs these three elements: • A great list • A great offer • And a great presentation If any of these elements lack the motive, you won’t be successful. An example of it is a general digital magazine advertisement. It has a numerous list of subscribers, beautiful design, conceptualization, but no specific offer or a call to action. The reader won’t take any interest in responding to that particular ad. Such campaigns face severe failure! But if your campaign has the base of these elements, you can expect a good ROI for your business. Tip Five: Social Media Secrets There is always some information hidden in the news or something that your community or industry talks about. So, it is good to keep a watch on such matters to generate good content. Social media is the most preferred platform to do such activities today. You probably don’t have time to get involved in every social media channel. So, it's better to involve in one channel than to be on multiple. So, watch the new, set up analytics for key topics important in the industry, and let inspiration spread in the form of information through your marketing materials like infographics, slides, images, and more. As Hootsuit studied on social media usage by marketing leaders, let’s have a quick look at which social media do aviation professionals use for marketing mostly. LinkedIn Rare: 0% Monthly: 31% Weekly: 25% Daily: 57% Facebook Monthly: 13% Weekly: 9% Daily: 20% Twitter Monthly: 17% Weekly: 14% Daily: 25% Instagram Monthly: 4% Weekly: 11% Daily: 3% YouTube Monthly: 21% Weekly: 14% Daily: 10% These indicate that your competitors mostly use LinkedIn and Facebook channels for marketing because aviation professionals are most likely to be using these channels frequently. If you produce interesting information, you can build a strong online audience. Tip Six: Bag the deal with 15 Second Sales Presentation Sales & sale—do it the right way! What do you say when a prospect asks you, “What do you do?” Here your 20-second sales presentation works in a roomful of sales-interested prospects! Sale is a process. If you have the proper steps to follow intelligently, you will have much better results. But remember, it should be contented and compelling to the right people, but non-pitchy. Follow these tips to deliver a fantastic presentation within seconds: • Reflect your USP (unique selling proposition) • Your company’s tagline • Keep it amazingly short • Avoid usage of over hyperbole— for example “We have most unbelievably wonderfully grand aviation products for you” • Be concise, professional, and elegant • Use non-technical language • Tell benefits than features • Use examples when necessary Deliver an approachable, responsive, and simple presentation that makes your prospect say, “Tell me more about that!” Apart from this, sales are also about passion. And if a prospect senses your passion for what you do, they become much comfortable with your offerings! So, do your homework. Prepare for it in advance. Know everything you can about the prospect; its company, services, mode of work, and more. Then have a faithful and specific objective in mind for each sales call. This will find your prospect’s best interest to discover more, take the conversation deeper, and thus, no one can stop you from getting the deal done. Tip Seven: Plan an Editorial Calendar An editorial calendar is crucial when it comes to marketing—branding, sales, and relationship building. Providing highly informational content to your prospects allows interacting. To simply put, your calendar is the best cover page. It will help to align the process of marketing items such as: • Planned campaigns • Webinars • Seasonal events • Launches • expenses Planned marketing will bring fascinating aviation business opportunities and will stimulate the aviation industry growth. Tip Eight: Be Financially Strong! This is a crucial part. Finance is what your top management wants to see. It is easy to come up with a huge, long, unproductive, and unrealistic marketing plan. However, planning a reasonable one that is capable of bringing success and probability together is truly an art. So, ensure to make an advanced one with a monthly income statement and include assumptions you make. Marketing in aviation is growing fast and is not expected to be sluggish anytime soon. With the rising aviation industry trends, it's easy to see opportunities beyond 2021. Therefore, all you need is an all-inclusive plan by following these tips. They will help you learn online aviation marketing solutions to increase traffic, ROI, brand image, and of course, raise conversation rates. After completing your marketing planning, read further to get familiar with using effective marketing strategies that will bring effective change to your business. Frequently Asked Questions What are some of the tips for creating an aviation marketing plan? Aviation marketing has nothing different from other marketing ways. It is just you need to pay attention to the range of audiences is in the aviation industry. However, here are some more tips: • Optimize your every content generation • Display your potential to the audience • Pay attention to ads • Leverage paid ads • Do email What is the importance of marketing in aviation? Aviation not only deals with passengers; it includes businesses to make money. For that, marketing plays a vital role in making people aware of product selling or providing services. It drives awareness of products, creates a brand image, builds trust among buyers, and provides valuable information to the audience in various forms using various channels. What is the difference between selling and marketing? Selling makes money directly from the prospects. While marketing is all about serving solutions and satisfying prospect needs. The method includes different stages—planning, analyzing, monitoring, execution, promotion, and distribution. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What are some of the tips for creating an aviation marketing plan?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Aviation marketing has nothing different from other marketing ways. It is just you need to pay attention to the range of audiences is in the aviation industry. However, here are some more tips: Optimize your every content generation Display your potential to the audience Pay attention to ads Leverage paid ads Do email" } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What is the importance of marketing in aviation?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Aviation not only deals with passengers; it includes businesses to make money. For that, marketing plays a vital role in making people aware of product selling or providing services. It drives awareness of products, creates a brand image, builds trust among buyers, and provides valuable information to the audience in various forms using various channels." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What is the difference between selling and marketing?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Selling makes money directly from the prospects. While marketing is all about serving solutions and satisfying prospect needs. The method includes different stages—planning, analyzing, monitoring, execution, promotion, and distribution." } }] }

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Where Will Vistara Fly Its New Boeing 787 Dreamliners?

Article | October 19, 2021

Vistara’s stunning new Boeing 787 Dreamliner has been officially unveiled in Delhi this week. While we’ve all enjoyed looking at the beautiful livery and new cabin products on board, the one question we all want answering is “where and when can we fly it?”. Vistara is being somewhat tight-lipped about its route plans for the aircraft. However, we can make some educated predictions about where we’re likely to see this beautiful bird in operation first.

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Is British Airways Eyeing A350 Flights To Melbourne Australia?

Article | October 19, 2021

The aviation world is abuzz with a rumor that British Airways is at least contemplating a return to the capital of Victoria. The UK flag carrier hasn’t flown to Melbourne since 2006, but inside information is suggesting that it’s a destination that is on the table for future network expansion. Currently, British Airways is the only UK airline still flying to Australia. Virgin Atlantic ended its London-Hong Kong-Sydney service in 2014, leaving just British Airways operating to Oceania, with its sole route a one stop itinerary between Heathrow and Sydney. Prior to this, BA had flown to Melbourne and Brisbane too, with stops in Hong Kong and Bangkok in the routings too.

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Have we entered the era of smaller airplanes for good?

Article | October 19, 2021

There’s been a lot of talk lately about airlines around the world beginning to favor smaller aircraft. Not just amid the pandemic but for the foreseeable future as well. The debate was given fuel when Lufthansa’s CEO made comments about potential down-gauging of its fleet ahead. But have we really entered the era of smaller airplanes for good? Many have argued that even when demand for air travel does return there will be less of it overall because of a precipitous and permanent drop in business travel. And beyond that, even where demand does exist, it will be for convenient, point-to-point service, not on A380s via big hubs – as smaller planes emerge that are capable of flying farther and people shy away from big, crowded airports and the hassle of connecting. All of which calls for smaller planes. I’ve argued recently that this seems a little hasty. Nevertheless, the jury is out, and as they say – only time will tell. Have smaller planes taken over flying? One thing we can look at is whether the notion that smaller planes rule the day holds true at major airlines right now. And pulling some Flightradar24 data we can see that this has been happening – mostly. The headline takeaway seems to be that bigger planes do still have their place, but for obvious reasons smaller wide-bodies have proven more desirable on many global routes during the past year. Lufthansa dropped its Very Large Aircraft quickly If we look at Lufthansa’s data, the trend is very clear right from the beginning of the pandemic. The A380 and the 747s (both -400 and -8I) took a definitive hit beginning in March 2020. That was it for the A380 and the 747-400 for good, it seems. The small rebound in A380 flights recorded in recent months were storage-related. And since the pandemic started, it’s clear that the smaller A330 has been clearly favored, taking up nearly double the percentage of flying it had at Lufthansa pre-pandemic. What’s most interesting here is that the 747-8I did come back, in some weeks to pre-pandemic levels. That’s quite a big plane. It is probably hard to fill these days. But it is Lufthansa’s flagship now – it has a First Class cabin and it can carry quite a bit of cargo. As a result it kept flying for a while on the bigger US routes like LAX. However recent dips in demand, and the winter season, saw the smaller and more fuel-efficient A350 come in to replace it on many routes. As I write this the Lufthansa 747-8I is in flight on just two routes – Mexico City (MEX) and Buenos Aires (EZE) to Frankfurt (FRA). If I were to take a guess, I’d say we continue to see the 747-8I for some time on these bigger routes and in busier seasons. It may turn out to be one of the last options for passengers to fly a 747 a few years from now. Eventually, though, the more efficient 777X will replace it. Though Lufthansa has said it’s looking to shift to smaller airplanes overall, the 777X seems a natural fit for its big hub to hub routes. I don’t think we’ll see a day when the A350 is the largest plane in Lufthansa’s fleet – at least as long as Germany remains Europe’s largest economy. Delta favors smaller, but only by a little bit If we look at Delta, which also has a wide range of wide-bodies in its fleet, the picture is a little more complicated. In part that’s because initially its 777s and A350s (both of which fit about 300 seats) took over quite a lot of flying while its smaller 767s (200 to 240 seats or so) were more or less parked. Since then, however, the 777 fleet has been retired and the 767s (both -300 and -400 series) have been doing nearly 60% of Delta’s wide-body flying. And its smallest Airbus wide-body, the A330-200, has flown much less throughout the pandemic. The A330-300, A330-900neo and A350-900 have filled in the rest of the flying, but while they were doing a majority of the wide-body flying in the first months, they’re not back to flying roughly the same percentage of Delta’s wide-body flights as before the pandemic. It’s interesting to note that a number of 767s have been retired during this time, and A330-300s have been used to fill the gaps where necessary despite having a higher seat count. If no 767s had been retired it’s likely the total percentage of flights run with the 767 would be even higher. What’s the bottom line? It seems that airlines have tended to park their biggest planes, but perhaps not as drastically as some might have expected. That may have had a lot to do with cargo capacity. But cargo capacity will continue to be a consideration post-pandemic as well, so it’s not as if these planes will prove useless once things get back to normal. And if we see the boom in travel demand that some are predicting is on the way, many of these larger aircraft may see they get plenty of use yet. Will there be less very large aircraft in airline fleets overall? Yes, probably. The A380 is all but done for except at a handful of airlines. And will smaller, long-range planes like the 787 prove popular in the years ahead? No doubt. But the bigger, fuel efficient planes like the 777X and A350-1000 will almost certainly still have their place in the sky too.

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Xactly Corp

Xactly delivers a scalable, enterprise platform for planning and incenting sales organizations, including sales quota and territory planning, incentive compensation management, and predictive analytics. Using this powerful sales performance management (SPM) portfolio, customers mitigate risk, accelerate sales performance, and increase business agility. Combined with Xactly Insights™-- the industry’s only empirical big data platform, Xactly empowers companies with real-time compensation insights and benchmarking data that maximize the bottom line. With an open, standards-based architecture, Xactly seamlessly integrates within an enterprise’s existing infrastructure, with the ability to work with any ERP, CRM, or HCM application, while meeting the highest enterprise standards in security, reliability, and privacy.

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