The U.S. Navy Tried to Sink This Aircraft Carrier for Weeks (And Failed)

| February 4, 2019

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To even try to sink an American flattop, you first must hit it. That's not easy, either. No carrier sails without an air wing with as many as 50 fighter aircraft plus several escorting destroyers, cruisers and submarines. A virtual wall of defensive weaponry surrounds the flattop out to a distance of several hundred miles.

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Prague Airport

Prague Airport is the operator of the most important international airport in the Czech Republic, with the status of one of Europe’s fastest growing airports in the 10-25 million passengers category. Every year, this international airport looks after more than 15 million passengers who can enjoy the offer of almost 70 airlines connecting Prague directly with more than 160 destinations all over the world during the year. Furthermore, eight regular cargo carriers and dozens of companies providing charter flights operate from here. Prague Airport employs almost 2,800 people and an estimated additional more than 14,000 people are employed by companies operating at the airport or linked to its operations.

OTHER ARTICLES

Which Airlines Should Order The Airbus A330-800neo?

Article | February 22, 2020

Last week, we received news that the Airbus A330-800 has finally achieved joint Type Certification from European and American civil aviation regulators. With this milestone achieved, airlines can feel even more confident adding the aircraft to their fleets. However, this smaller variant of the A330neo has only been ordered by a few airlines, in small quantities. Today we’ll look at what other airlines around the world might benefit from the A330-800.

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What Aircraft Are Best Suited For Arctic Flight?

Article | February 22, 2020

When operating aircraft above the Arctic Circle (66.5° N latitude) there are certain hazards to be aware of. We decided to take a look at what aircraft are best suited for Arctic flight.A huge problem with flying in the Arctic is not just icing, but the visual restrictions that are placed on pilots. During the spring and fall, whiteout or flat light can distort what a pilot sees. The horizon can suddenly disappear making objects appear as if they are floating in the air. This can make things like mountain ranges extremely difficult to judge.

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An uncertain future for cruise and aviation

Article | February 22, 2020

As we begin to hit what would be the peak season toward the middle of spring and start of summer, instead of reading stories of holiday go-ers preparing for their next big escape, we’re instead reading stories of two huge industries that may suffer huge losses following the coronavirus pandemic. As it currently stands, all major cruise lines have had major disruptions to their services as they’re forced to lay off thousands of workers indefinitely whilst ports to many countries remain closed for the foreseeable future - the first big disruption to the industry since 9/11. And whilst the extended period of time in which services aren’t running for, the issues that the cruise liners may suffer from most could be a damaged reputation following the spread of infections amongst a number of ships. With many different people from many different countries all coming together in one confined space, it allowed the virus to spread very quickly in some instances, such as the Diamond Princess, reporting over 700 confirmed cases .

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Why The Airbus A220 Is The Plane Of The Future

Article | February 22, 2020

The Airbus A220 isn’t really a new aircraft. Bombardier first flew the CSeries in September 2013, with its entry into service in July 2016. And yet, the A220 seems to be answering problems that we’re not quite having yet. Airbus predicts a need for 7,000 A220s over the next two decades, and that’s probably not too overoptimistic. Here’s how the A220 is the plane of the future, today. The landscape of aviation is changing. In the past, airlines operated on hub and spoke models, passengers were happy to fit around schedules and the price of jet fuel was so low that efficiency wasn’t a huge consideration. Clearly, aviation today is very different.

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Spotlight

Prague Airport

Prague Airport is the operator of the most important international airport in the Czech Republic, with the status of one of Europe’s fastest growing airports in the 10-25 million passengers category. Every year, this international airport looks after more than 15 million passengers who can enjoy the offer of almost 70 airlines connecting Prague directly with more than 160 destinations all over the world during the year. Furthermore, eight regular cargo carriers and dozens of companies providing charter flights operate from here. Prague Airport employs almost 2,800 people and an estimated additional more than 14,000 people are employed by companies operating at the airport or linked to its operations.

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