Top Aviation Services

| June 14, 2016

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67 million passengers flew worldwide in 1960 and 5 billion passengers flew worldwide in 2010. In 1960 there were no security procedures and no I.D was necessary, nowadays 54% of travelers think that queues at security are too long, and 25% think security rules are excessive.

Spotlight

Cargolux Airlines

Cargolux is Europe’s biggest all-cargo airline with a large fleet of modern Boeing 747-400 and 747-8 freighters. The company was launch customer and the world’s first operator of both aircraft types and uses its modern fleet and a number of trucking contractors to move valuable and time-sensitive commodities on its worldwide network that covers some 90 destinations.

OTHER ARTICLES

Could Altitude Hold The Key To Reducing Aviation Emissions?

Article | February 22, 2020

According to a new study, aircraft altitude could hold the key to drastically reducing global warming. Research shows that a lower flying altitude could help the aviation industry reduce its carbon footprint. That’s despite the fuel inefficiency of low altitude flights. When it comes to the climate, the aviation industry is heavily focused on investing in new technologies to keep passengers in the air. From biofuels to new aircraft designs, the focus is on bringing a green evolution to aviation. However, what if the answer to combatting climate change already existed? It might be a case of casting aside the rulebook and looking at aviation’s carbon footprint from a different angle.

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The Boeing 777X – What Does The Future Look Like Now?

Article | February 22, 2020

The aviation world is rapidly changing due to the current crisis, and no one is more affected than airframe builders like Boeing. With the Boeing 777X due to start service at the end of the year, has the crisis affected the new flagship aircraft’s development?Boeing is building a new generation of the popular widebody 777, much as it did with the narrowbody 737. This new version will have new technologies and new engineering, inspired in part by innovations built into the Boeing 787. These include bigger windows, a composite fuselage, and state-of-the-art cabins.

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What To Expect From SWISS’ First Airbus A320neo

Article | February 22, 2020

On Thursday the 20th of February, SWISS will welcome its first Airbus A320neo. Here’s what to expect from the Lufthansa subsidiary’s new aircraft. SWISS is preparing for its new Airbus A320neo to enter into service. The first A320neo made its inaugural flight from the Airbus factory in Hamburg earlier this month and will be delivered to the airline’s hub at Zurich airport on Thursday this week.

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BUSINESS AVIATION

How to be eco-friendly in the aviation industry?

Article | February 22, 2020

Each year airlines begin new sustainability initiatives, experiment with biofuels, and offset their carbon emissions on selected flights; yet, sustainability should not only be a topic of discussion when an aircraft is in the air but also when it’s on the ground. In just one year, a Boeing 777, 787, Airbus A330, and A350, burn an extra 265,000 litres of fuel due to the 1% increase in drag. As a result, a full year’s operations of such an aircraft costs US$77,600 more than during the previous year. A dirty aircraft exterior is full of microscopic patches of dust and mud that impact the airliner’s operational efficiency by creating turbulent airflow across the whole fuselage. While the problem of additional drag is not new, there are no solutions to combat it other than performing regular cleaning of the aircraft’s exterior. Reducing drag – through cleaning – on aircraft fuselage, wings, engine cowlings, and stabilizer brings another challenge; how to remain sustainable while performing the exterior cleaning process? A popular, yet wasteful pressurized water cleaning technique requires more than 11,300 litres of water to clean one Airbus A380 aircraft and more than 9,500 litres to clean a Boeing 777. Traditionally, aircraft are cleaned four to five times per year, and with more than 48 thousand airframes in the world, the amount of water used each year is immense. As a result, the positives of clean fuselages are outweighed by the negatives of wasteful usage of expensive and environmentally important resources. This raises a question: whether it is possible to be eco-friendly in the aviation industry when one solution brings even more challenges than benefits? While the answer may look complicated, the definite answer is yes. The use of robots in household applications has proven that robotification is an inevitable and much-needed process to achieve even more efficient operational performance. One of the solutions to address the inefficient and time-consuming process of washing an aircraft fuselage is to employ an aircraft exterior cleaning robot. The market offerings like Nordic Dino, have been perfected and adapted to work with a wide range of aircraft fuselage types. Such robots are designed to minimize the use of water and detergent on every wash; saving more than 30% more water when compared to traditional washing methods. At the same time, built with sustainability in mind, the robots can be equipped with electric motors, further minimizing the environmental impact. “Sustainability and eco-friendliness should not be viewed as challenges or impossible achievements in the aviation industry. By utilizing the right equipment, finding alternatives to polluting methods, and increasing efficiency at every step possible, companies could come one step closer to operational efficiency as well as sustainability targets. Our offering, Nordic Dino can reduce the use of water and detergent and can be powered by electricity, reducing carbon and nitrogen dioxide emissions. By the robotification of the cleaning process we present a solution to MROs and dedicated aircraft cleaning companies to become green.” – commented Jan Brunstedt, CEO of Aviator Robotics AB.

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Spotlight

Cargolux Airlines

Cargolux is Europe’s biggest all-cargo airline with a large fleet of modern Boeing 747-400 and 747-8 freighters. The company was launch customer and the world’s first operator of both aircraft types and uses its modern fleet and a number of trucking contractors to move valuable and time-sensitive commodities on its worldwide network that covers some 90 destinations.

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