WestJet reports 80% load factor in November 2016

December 13, 2016 | 309 views

WestJet today has reported a load factor of 80.0 per cent in November 2016, an increase of 1.4 percentage points year over year, the company said. Revenue passenger miles (RPMs), or traffic, increased 14.3 per cent year over year, and capacity, measured in available seat miles (ASMs), grew 12.4 per cent over the same period. The airline flew a record 1.7 million guests in November, a year-over-year increase of 12.1 per cent or approximately 185,000 additional guests.

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Scaled Composites, LLC

Scaled Composites, LLC is an aerospace and specialty composites development company located in Mojave, California (about 80 miles north of Los Angeles). Founded in 1982 by Burt Rutan, Scaled has broad experience in air vehicle design, tooling and manufacturing, specialty composite structure design, analysis and fabrication, and developmental flight tests of air and space vehicles.

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DEFENSE AND SPACE

What 2019 Taught Us About the U.S. Airline Industry

Article | June 8, 2022

For U.S. airlines, the fourth earnings season is now complete. And as is customary these days, all players produced solid profits. Collectively, Delta, American, United, Southwest, Alaska, JetBlue, Hawaiian, Spirit, and Allegiant reached a double-digit operating margin, topping 10 percent on nearly $46 billion in revenues. For all of 2019, they earned 11 percent on $184 billion. The year before: 10 percent on $175 billion. No other country has an airline industry so stable and profitable. What were the highlights of the final quarter of the final year of the decade? Here’s a review:

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AIR TRANSPORT

What’s Interesting About 2019’s Busiest International Routes?

Article | July 6, 2022

Have you ever thought about which routes around the world see the most traffic? What would your guesses be? Every year, the organization OAG (Official Airline Guide) puts out a publication detailing the world’s busiest routes. Their 2019 report had some interesting findings. Here’s what it revealed.

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AIR TRANSPORT

Why The Airbus A220 Is The Plane Of The Future

Article | July 26, 2022

The Airbus A220 isn’t really a new aircraft. Bombardier first flew the CSeries in September 2013, with its entry into service in July 2016. And yet, the A220 seems to be answering problems that we’re not quite having yet. Airbus predicts a need for 7,000 A220s over the next two decades, and that’s probably not too overoptimistic. Here’s how the A220 is the plane of the future, today. The landscape of aviation is changing. In the past, airlines operated on hub and spoke models, passengers were happy to fit around schedules and the price of jet fuel was so low that efficiency wasn’t a huge consideration. Clearly, aviation today is very different.

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Why Does Aegean Want To Buy Croatia Airlines?

Article | February 10, 2020

Croatia Airlines is on sale, and Aegean Airlines expressed an interest to buy it. Why did the Greek flag carrier do this, and what plans could it have for Croatia Airlines? For several years now, the government of Croatia has been trying to sell Croatia Airlines. The national airline is loss-making and has not launched a single new route in 2019.

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Spotlight

Scaled Composites, LLC

Scaled Composites, LLC is an aerospace and specialty composites development company located in Mojave, California (about 80 miles north of Los Angeles). Founded in 1982 by Burt Rutan, Scaled has broad experience in air vehicle design, tooling and manufacturing, specialty composite structure design, analysis and fabrication, and developmental flight tests of air and space vehicles.

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Boeing to host a new round of updates on the 737 MAX

Boeing | December 03, 2019

The Boeing Co. this week is sending industry stakeholders to Seattle to provide an update on its work to return the 737 MAX to service. Boeing spokesperson Paul Bergman says the event, scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday, will provide invited guests with a two-day review of 737 MAX software upgrades, training and the certification process. “This is a further element in our outreach across the industry, with more than 20 global conferences, and a series of briefings and simulator sessions that in all have reached more than 1,600 participants and over 300 organizations,” Bergman said in an emailed response to the WBJ. “The goal is to provide industry stakeholders a firm foundation of knowledge in the technical and training updates for the 737 MAX at the appropriate point in the certification process. The visit will help them understand how the MAX software update and training will prevent an MCAS-related accident from ever happening again and the changes Boeing has made as a result of the accidents.”

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Army Uses Mad Scientist Gathering to Explore Emerging Technologies

Nationaldefense | May 31, 2019

Austin, texas to better understand new technologies and scientific efforts that could aid warfighters, the army is connecting with industry and academia through its “mad scientist” initiative. the service is asking itself where the military challenges and opportunities are moving forward, lee grubbs, mad scientist director, said in an interview with national defense on the sidelines of the program’s annual conference. we translate that into real-person speak civilian speak. we look at where analogies of that exist in the commercial world.as the service has shifted focus from counterinsurgency to large-scale operations, the army decided the time was right to bring back the mad scientist program a few years ago, grubbs said. the 2018 national defense strategy puts a renewed focus on countering great power adversaries such as russia and china.

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Lunar Module How do you land on the Moon?

Astronomy | May 31, 2019

North American's Moon lander was ugly and "buglike," but Neil Armstrong and five additional missions used it to safely touch down on the surface. When NASA began working out the details of how to land on the Moon, the mission involved one spacecraft, not two. But when the agency changed its approach in July 1962, committing instead to Lunar Orbit Rendezvous, a new plan emerged. Now, one astronaut would stay aboard the heavy mothership in lunar orbit, while his two crewmates would descend to the surface. What they would descend in was unclear. No one knew how to land on another world, much less how to build something that could land on the Moon, so NASA asked interested contractors to submit bids to build the Lunar Excursion Module.

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Boeing to host a new round of updates on the 737 MAX

Boeing | December 03, 2019

The Boeing Co. this week is sending industry stakeholders to Seattle to provide an update on its work to return the 737 MAX to service. Boeing spokesperson Paul Bergman says the event, scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday, will provide invited guests with a two-day review of 737 MAX software upgrades, training and the certification process. “This is a further element in our outreach across the industry, with more than 20 global conferences, and a series of briefings and simulator sessions that in all have reached more than 1,600 participants and over 300 organizations,” Bergman said in an emailed response to the WBJ. “The goal is to provide industry stakeholders a firm foundation of knowledge in the technical and training updates for the 737 MAX at the appropriate point in the certification process. The visit will help them understand how the MAX software update and training will prevent an MCAS-related accident from ever happening again and the changes Boeing has made as a result of the accidents.”

Read More

Army Uses Mad Scientist Gathering to Explore Emerging Technologies

Nationaldefense | May 31, 2019

Austin, texas to better understand new technologies and scientific efforts that could aid warfighters, the army is connecting with industry and academia through its “mad scientist” initiative. the service is asking itself where the military challenges and opportunities are moving forward, lee grubbs, mad scientist director, said in an interview with national defense on the sidelines of the program’s annual conference. we translate that into real-person speak civilian speak. we look at where analogies of that exist in the commercial world.as the service has shifted focus from counterinsurgency to large-scale operations, the army decided the time was right to bring back the mad scientist program a few years ago, grubbs said. the 2018 national defense strategy puts a renewed focus on countering great power adversaries such as russia and china.

Read More

Lunar Module How do you land on the Moon?

Astronomy | May 31, 2019

North American's Moon lander was ugly and "buglike," but Neil Armstrong and five additional missions used it to safely touch down on the surface. When NASA began working out the details of how to land on the Moon, the mission involved one spacecraft, not two. But when the agency changed its approach in July 1962, committing instead to Lunar Orbit Rendezvous, a new plan emerged. Now, one astronaut would stay aboard the heavy mothership in lunar orbit, while his two crewmates would descend to the surface. What they would descend in was unclear. No one knew how to land on another world, much less how to build something that could land on the Moon, so NASA asked interested contractors to submit bids to build the Lunar Excursion Module.

Read More

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