Air France to retire A380 by 2022

FlightGlobal | July 30, 2019

Air France to retire A380 by 2022
Air France will retire its Airbus A380 fleet by 2022 and is studying options to replace the double-deck type with twinjets.The airline previously decided to decommission three of its 10 A380s and now approved in principle the retirement of the remaining seven aircraft, Air France-KLM says.Five of the seven aircraft in question are owned by Air France, while the balance is leased.Air France-KLM says that the current competitive environment limits the markets in which the A380 can profitably operate.The airline asserts that the four-engined aircraft's per-seat fuel consumption is 20-25% higher than "new-generation" long-haul twinjets.

Spotlight

ICAO first initiated the development of Standards and Recommended Practices related to aircraft noise in the 1960s with similar work on smoke emissions from aircraft engine following shortly thereafter. These efforts were aimed to limit the adverse impact of international civil aviation on the environment becoming a strategic objective of the Organization.

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Spotlight

ICAO first initiated the development of Standards and Recommended Practices related to aircraft noise in the 1960s with similar work on smoke emissions from aircraft engine following shortly thereafter. These efforts were aimed to limit the adverse impact of international civil aviation on the environment becoming a strategic objective of the Organization.