An e-cigarette caught on fire on an American Airlines flight in Chicago

Pulse | January 07, 2019

An e-cigarette caught on fire on an American Airlines flight in Chicago
An e-cigarette caught fire shortly after an American Airlines plane landed in Chicago on Friday. Flight attendants quickly extinguished the blaze, the airline said in a statement. It's the latest incident in a spate of electrical fires onboard planes. The battery of an e-cigarette ignited on an American Airlines flight shortly after landing at Chicago's OHare airport on Friday. In a statement to Business Insider, an airline spokesperson said "flight attendants quickly extinguished the fire and the plane taxied to the gate," noting that employees are trained on fighting battery fires and that it would report the event to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Spotlight

As a result of DoD transformation plans and recent operational experience (Air War Over Serbia and Operation ENDURING FREEDOM) portions of the 1999 U.S. Air Force White Paper on Long Range Bombers have become outmoded. In October 2001, the Secretary of the Air Force directed an updated Long-Range Strike Aircraft White Paper incorporating our new defense planning guidance. This document provides an update to the 1999 White Paper and reflects current decisions concerning bomber force structure and basing.

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AVIATION TECHNOLOGY

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Spotlight

As a result of DoD transformation plans and recent operational experience (Air War Over Serbia and Operation ENDURING FREEDOM) portions of the 1999 U.S. Air Force White Paper on Long Range Bombers have become outmoded. In October 2001, the Secretary of the Air Force directed an updated Long-Range Strike Aircraft White Paper incorporating our new defense planning guidance. This document provides an update to the 1999 White Paper and reflects current decisions concerning bomber force structure and basing.